Exosome Standards

Exosome Standards

Exosome Standards : Lyophilzed Exosomes

Lyophilized Exosome Standards are sold in vials containing 100 µg or 30 µg of total protein (100 µg is > 1x10^10 Particles/ml, 30 µg is > 1x10^8 Particles/ml)

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HansaBioMed lyophilized exosomes were obtained from different biological sources that includes exosomes from human biofluids of certified healthy donors (plasma, serum, urine, saliva) and from different cell culture media. Exosome isolation is obtained through a combination of ultracentrifugation and microfiltration procedures. Exosomes are subsequently quantified and validated for overall protein content and particle number by NTA with Nanosight. Effects of lyophilization on stability of exosome proteins are comparable to other storage methods such as storing fresh exosomes at -20C. Lyophilized exosomes are easy to store and ship and are stable for long term (up to 36 months).

Applications: Assay calibration, Control (spike-in) for exosome quantification, protein marker analysis using different techniques. Extraction and analysis of exosome nucleic acid. Standardized positive controls for immunocapture performance evaluation. Flow cytometry. Electron microschopy.

Advantages: Highly pure, easy to reconstitute, easy to ship and store (+4°C), Long term storage stability (36 months). Exosomes are available from a large cell line bank (over 100 cell lines) on request.

References:

Sitar, Simona, et al. “Size characterization and quantification of exosomes by asymmetrical-flow field-flow fractionation.” Analytical chemistry (2015).

Gardiner, Chris, et al. “Measurement of refractive index by nanoparticle tracking analysis reveals heterogeneity in extracellular vesicles.” Journal of extracellular vesicles 3(2014).

Ferrante, Sarah C., et al. “Adipocyte-derived exosomal miRNAs: a novel mechanism for obesity-related disease.” Pediatric research 77.3 (2014): 447-454.

Specifications:

Description

Lyophilized and purified exosomes from cell culture supernatant

Amount of lyophilized exosomes

Prepared in either 100μg or 30μg vials, sold in packages of 2, 4 or 6 vials

Origin

COLO-1 (human colon carcinoma cell line)

MM-1 (human melanoma cell line)

BLCL (EBV transformed lymphoblastoid B cell line)

HCT116 (human colon carcinoma cell line)

U87MG (human glioblastoma cell line)

SK-N-SH (human neuroblastoma cell line)

PC3 cell line (human prostate adenocarcinoma grade IV)

BPH-1 cell line (human being prostatic hyperplasia)

DAUDI cell line (human burkitt lymphoma)

A549 cell line (lung carcinoma)

K-562 cell line (pleural effusion, leukemia chronic myelogenous)

B16F10 mouse cell line (mouse melanoma cell line)

Storage of lyophilized exosomes

Store up to 3 years at 4°C

Storage of reconstituted exosomes

Stored at -20°C for up to one month or at -80°C for up to 6 months. Recommended to avoid repeated freeze-and-thaw cycles

Downstream applications

Assay calibration.

Control (spike-in) for exosome quantification.

Protein marker analysis using different techniques.

Extraction and analysis of exosome nucleic acid.

Standardized positive controls for immunocapture performance evaluation.

Flow cytometry.

Electron microscopy.

Lyophilization & Purification Service

HansaBioMed can provide lyophilized exosomes from a selection of proprietary and not proprietary cell lines in desired aliquots (also in large quantities). With our Purification and Quantification Service, we can purify and quantify exosomes from any cell culture sample and, if desired, provide NTA quantification using NanoSight. We can also provide cell lysates from the same cell lines.  Please contact us for additional information on this service.

 

Recent Papers:

Sitar, Simona, et al. “Size characterization and quantification of exosomes by asymmetrical-flow field-flow fractionation.” Analytical chemistry (2015).

Gardiner, Chris, et al. “Measurement of refractive index by nanoparticle tracking analysis reveals heterogeneity in extracellular vesicles.” Journal of extracellular vesicles 3(2014).

Ferrante, Sarah C., et al. “Adipocyte-derived exosomal miRNAs: a novel mechanism for obesity-related disease.” Pediatric research 77.3 (2014): 447-454.